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Started By dafortae (a, a, U.S.A.)

Started on: 9/4/2005 8:34:42 PM, viewed 11131 times
Dual Factor Training

Well, I did research on Dual Factor Training. I wanted to make sure I totally understood what it was about. I soon found how impractical it is by the following paragraphs (from http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/core_feb_6.htm):

""How Will I Know How Hard To Load And Unload?"

Well, honestly, it′s not an exact science. The easiest thing to do is to start this program and load for only one week, and follow it with a one week unloading period. If you felt fine, and never felt like you were overreaching, then try to load for 2 weeks next, followed again by a one week unloading period. If you are still fine, then you could even try loading for 3 weeks, followed again, by just one week of unloading.

I would note, however, that I have found that most athletes do best with a 2 week loading period, followed by a one week unloading period.

For unloading, it′s usually best if intensity is kept relatively high. (Intensity is not a perception of how hard you are working, but is a term relating to how close of a % to your rep maximum you are working – therefore, it′s important during unloading weeks to still train heavy.)

However, even though intensity is kept high during unloading, volume is drastically reduced, by dropping the workouts from approximately 7 exercises down to only two or three. Frequency (number of training sessions per week) is sometimes reduced, but in this program it′s kept the same."

There are too many variables involved there. Dropping exercises from the "magic number" 7, down to 2 or 3, frequency SOMETIMES reduced, but the program is kept the same.

"The first thing to remember about the program is that it is setup with periods of peaking fatigue (called "loading"), where you will slowly reach the point of overreaching (near overtraining). "

I like how they say "overreaching" is NEAR OVERTRAINING. Give me a break. You′re either overtraining or not. If you FEEL worn down, you ARE overtrained. If you MUST INCREASE REST TIME, it means you′ve "overtrained" past the previous requirement of rest. That′s all there is to it. It′s just

not practical to "overreach".

""How Will I Know If I Am Overreaching?"

Well, again, it′s not an exact science, but you′ll feel lethargic, your joints will probably hurt, and most importantly, the amount of weight you can lift will begin to decrease."

No sorry, that′s OVERTRAINING. These morons are trying to create a new term and avoid using OVERTRAINING when in fact it is the same thing. If your strength decreases, THAT′S THE VERY DEFINITION OF OVERTRAINING (lack of progress).

"If at any time the weights you are using fall down to 85% or so of your previous best, then you are overreaching (and nearing overtraining), and it′s time to start unloading. "

Again, give me a fricken break. OVERTRAINING.

"When you hit that point, then it′s time to back off the volume substantially for a week or so and allow your body to recover from the two hard weeks of loading. "

What loading? You′re not "loading" yourself WITH ANYTHING. You′re DELOADING the energy from your muscles. Come on, at least use a better word.

Basically, the theory sounds plausible when you hear it by itself. But when you try to APPLY it to real life, you then realize how many variables and holes there are. It′s just a slightly better way of "guessing" about progress than volume training.

"If done correctly, the result will be a noticeable improvement in size and strength following the unloading period."

Ok, so there′s a way to do it INCORRECTLY? Oh yeah right, I forgot, there are too many variables to get it right all the time. Heavy Duty/HIT′s approach has many less variables, and this is why so many people come to this forum and workout in this manner. It′s much EASIER to make great progress.

"Progressive Overload

This is a simple term to understand, most guys make it too complicated. Simply stated, if you complete all your reps for a given exercise, then next time bump up the weight 5-10 pounds. If you don′t complete all the reps, then keep the weight the same until you do. Now was that hard?"

Oh my. I cannot even begin to say how ignorant that paragraph was. ′IF YOU DON′T COMPLETE ALL THE REPS, THEN KEEP THE WEIGHT THE SAME UNTIL YOU DO.′ Damn! Why didn′t I think of that! This whole time, all you had to do was keep working out with the same weight, and eventually you′ll get stronger! That is wrong on so many levels I won′t even go into it…

"For unloading weeks, reduce volume drastically by completing only the first two exercises on lower body days, and the first three exercises on upper body days. Slightly reduce intensity/load (with regards to one rep max – ie. – drop your weights down just a tad), "

I′m sorry, and how much is a "tad"?

In the end, ONLY STRENGTH GAINS count. These "loading" (really deloading) phases are complete nonsense and a waste of time. Had one spent the time more wisely (and with their friends, family, etc.), they would have progressed even more in strength. This is just another spin on sneaking in useless volume training for those with superior genetics or drugs, and for those who aren′t willing to accept the theory of HIT.

In all honesty, I TRIED to read it with as open of a mind as possible. Once the bullshit starts hitting me in the face, I can′t help but tear apart the mystical nonsense.

Ok, done ranting…

Darrell

This Topic has 249 Replies: Displaying out of 249 Replies:

Jeff (Toronto, M5T, Canada) on 9/4/2005 11:53:19 PM

This is exactly what I expected of you. Well done mate!!!

Here is a small sample of some funny ones that tow the party line, show a lack of understanding, and ignore real world results……..

"I like how they say "overreaching" is NEAR OVERTRAINING. Give me a break. YouŒre either overtraining or not…….

Basically, the theory sounds plausible when you hear it by itself. But when you try to APPLY it to real life, you then realize how many variables and holes there are…………

What loading? YouŒre not "loading" yourself WITH ANYTHING. YouŒre DELOADING the energy from your muscles……..

These "loading" (really deloading) phases are complete nonsense and a waste of time….This is just another spin on sneaking in useless volume training for those with superior genetics or drugs, and for those who arenŒt willing to accept the theory of HIT…………..

In all honesty, I TRIED to read it with as open of a mind as possible. Once the bullshit starts hitting me in the face, I canŒt help but tear apart the mystical nonsense……………"

BWAHAHAHAHAHAAH!!!!! Classic!!!! Some of those are just mind boggelingly ignorant…"What loading?"…hehehe…The Mentzerian reference to mysticism is especially well placed.

Remember, you′ve read one little crap article on good ol′ bb.com about this, and have made your judgements based on that alone. You have never tried it yourself, nor have you taken the time to talk to anyone who′s figured it out. Also, you choose to ignore real world results, and explain all the success stories away with genetics and drugs. But I guess you′re an expert now, and have more knowledge and experience than almost all the top strength coaches and athletes on the planet. Moreover, like HIT, there are many different ideas and variations. You can choose to ignore that as well if you want.

"ItŒs much EASIER to make great progress (with HIT)."

– Again, our ideas of what "great progress" means differs. I obviously set the bar a little higher than you there.

Man, I can′t belive I once spouted the same BS. *Hangs head in shame* I hope some lurkers are at least open enough to see how ridiculous Darrell′s "critique" is. I urge you to actively seek out information outside the HIT bubble, and refrain from making a judgement based on the sad display of "open mindedness" above.

Jeff

Adman (Sydney, NSW, Australia) on 9/5/2005 8:14:52 AM

Nice Darrell. Real nice.

hd52 (davidson, nc, U.S.A.) on 9/5/2005 3:59:33 PM

Good post, Darrell. My take on DFT is that it is a glorified form of heavy/light training.

Tdrag (Belgrade, Serbia, Serbia) on 9/5/2005 10:22:50 PM

Jeff I 100% agree with you.I was in the same boat as you.Had "weak genetics" with Heavy Duty, and then same genetics exploded with more volume and frequency(water/pump gain my ass i kept the mass for 3 months of injury and still have it).

Now I say to myself, ok let those HD-ers be right 1000 times, i will be satisfied with real world results.

That genetics thing is screwing your mind guys…..its best not to talk about it.How do you determine

that you have bad genetics?You are small – thats not a proof of anything.Short muscle bellies? -theres too much guys with big muscles AND short bellies.I really want to know how you know that you have bad genetics.Even Mike said that its something that should be looked upon only in retrospect.Problem is that you guys are so dogmatical about your training(Heavy Duty is only valid theory …..) that you are left only with conclusion that you are naturaly weak.

HD has a real problem going on….you gain strength regulary and thats ok, you gain mass at the beggining but within 4-5 months all stops.Cyclic gains ….yeah yeah i heard it all (and believed it).

Check these same boards, there are dozens of cases from people that "stopped gaining on ideal routine".

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